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D.iet & H.ealth : C.ancer Last Updated: Nov 30th, 2006 - 19:09:14


Added sugar may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer
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Nov 30, 2006, 19:07

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By Jimmy Downs
Hicenter.com

Eating lots of sugar or sugar-rich foods may increase the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest cancers, according to s Swedish study published in the November issue of American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Dr. Susanna C. Larsson, a veteran researcher in epidemiology from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and her colleagues found that those who added sugar to their food and consumed lots of sugar were at a significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who did not use sugar-added drink.

For the study, researchers followed 77,797 men and women age 45 to 83 for an average of about seven years. They found those who ate five or more servings of added sugar daily such as sugar-added tea and coffee were 69 percent more likely to acquire pancreatic cancer compared to those who never added sugar in their food and drink.

Those who drank two or more servings of soft drinks per day had a 93 percent higher risk of pancreatic cancer than those who did not use soft drinks. Eating sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit was also linked with a 51 percent higher risk.

The researchers suspected that too much sugar could demand more insulin from the pancreas, which in turn increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include sedentary lifestyle, obesity and diabetes, which cause loss of sensitivity to the blood-sugar processing hormone insulin.


Copyright 2006 Hicenter.com, All right reserved.


Note: This article can be freely distributed without a written permit from Hicenter.com as long as it is published in its entirety including author, affiliation with the link, the copyright information and the note.





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