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F.ood & H.ealth : T.echnologies Last Updated: Nov 12th, 2006 - 20:38:00


Apple Washes Shield Sliced Fruit From Pathogens
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Oct 29, 2006, 11:33

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Experimental washes, also called antibrowning dips, for freshly sliced apples show promise for keeping the fruit safe to eat, while at the same time protecting its appealing textures, flavors and colors (Food Microbiology, volume 21, pages 319 to 326). Laboratory experiments by ARS researchers based in Beltsville, Md., showed these protective effects in tests with freshly cut apple slices.

Today's calcium-ascorbate-based washes forestall browning but apparently don't knock out as extensive a range of unwanted microbes, according to the Maryland scientists. The newer formulations, not only kept the apple slices from browning, but also killed unwanted microbes.

For details, contact: Arvind A Bhagwat, (301) 504-5106; USDA-ARS Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Md.

Republished from http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/np/fnrb/fnrb1006.htm#apples




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