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D.iet & H.ealth : H.eart & B.lood Last Updated: Nov 12th, 2006 - 20:38:00


Choline Helps Halt Harmful Homocysteine Buildup
By USDA-ARS
Jul 22, 2006, 13:20

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Getting high--or at least adequate--levels of choline in meals and snacks may help prevent unhealthful buildup of homocysteine in your blood. High blood homocysteine levels are thought to increase risk of heart attack, stroke, dementia and cancer.

Choline powers our brains, converts fat into energy, and performs other essential biochemical activities.

Scientists at the ARS Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Mass., and their co-investigators examined the relation between choline intake and blood homocysteine levels that were recorded in food questionnaires or blood tests of 1,960 volunteers in the Framingham Offspring Study (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition volume 83, pages 905 to 911).

Important choline sources include eggs, liver and other meats, fish, beans, wheat bran, nuts, dairy products and soy foods.

For details contact: Paul F. Jacques, (617) 556-3322; ARS Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Mass. email: paul.jacques@tufts.edu

Source: USDA-ARS




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