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D.iet & H.ealth : H.eart & B.lood Last Updated: Nov 12th, 2006 - 20:38:00


Low salt intake in childhood may reduce hypertension risk
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Nov 11, 2006, 20:58

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By Jimmy Downs
Hicenter

Children who have low salt intake may have a reduced risk of blood pressure, which may in turn reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in their adulthood, according to a new study published in the November issue of the medical journal Hypertension.

The study, led by Drs. Feng He and Graham A. MacGregor from St. George's University of London, UK, found a modest reduction of salt intake immediately leads to a small, but statistically significant drop in blood pressure.

High blood pressure is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which is responsible for 62 percent of strokes and 49 percent of coronary heart disease, according to Reuters, citing the authors as saying.

The authors reviewed ten clinical trials involving 966 children aged 13 on average and salt intake was reduced by 42 percent on average for four weeks.

They found that blood pressure dropped by a bit more than one point, which was small, but statistically significant.

Long term reduction of salt intake in children may decrease the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in adulthood, the authors suggest.

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Copyright 2006 Hicenter.com

Note: This article can be freely distributed without a written permit from hicenter.com as long as it is published in its entirety including author, affiliation with the link and the note.




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