All News 
 Misc. News
 F.eatured P.roducts
 R.ecalls & A.lerts
 C.onsumer A.ffair
 Non-f.ood Things
 L.etter to E.ditor
 H.ealth T.ips
 Interesting Sites
 D.iet & H.ealth
 H.eart & B.lood
 B.ody W.eight
 C.hildren & W.omen
 G.eneral H.ealth
 F.ood & H.ealth
 F.ood C.hemicals
 B.iological A.gents
 C.ooking & P.acking
 Agri. & Environ. & P.olitics
 F.ood C.onsumer
 FC News & Others

Newsfeed news feed

FC InsiderNews

Submit news[release]
PT writers wanted

Sponsors' link
profood - food ingredients supplier
shopseek shop dir.
infoplus web dir.

D.iet & H.ealth : B.ody W.eight Last Updated: Nov 12th, 2006 - 20:38:00

Most obese people claim to eat healthy
By Ben Wasserman
Aug 3, 2006, 08:21

E.mail t.his a.rticle
 P.rinter f.riendly p.age
Get n.ewsletter
Aug 3( - More than three-quarters of obese people in the United States say they have healthy eating habits, a new phone survey found.

In the survey of 11,000 people, about 40 percent of obese people claimed they do exercise three times a week.

There might be a denial or these people do not understand the healthy eating concept, suggested Dr. David Schutt of Thomson Medstat, the health-care research firm based in Michigan that conducted the survey.

The study also found 28 percent of obese people reported snacking two or three times a day compared to 24 percent of normal weight people who snacked as often.

A scientist associated with suggested it should not be surprising so many obese people claimed they eat healthy. That is at least one of the reasons why those people gain excess weight although there may be other factors affecting weight gain, he suggested.

Snacking between meals is not a healthy eating habit for people who do not take a job that requires burning a lot of calories, he added. One becomes obese because intake of calories exceeds the expenditure of energy in the body. But what and how people eat can be a factor for weight gain. The surveyors did not ask what and how the obese people eat.

Dr. T. Colin Campbell, a retired nutrition professor from Cornell University suggested in his book "The China Study" that people who eat plant foods are less likely to become obese compared to those who follow a diet full of meat products. This is true even when those who eat a lot of plant foods have higher intake of calories.

The latest data from the National Center for Health Statistics show that 30 percent of U.S. adults 20 years of age and older—over 60 million people—are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

© 2004-2005 by unless otherwise specified

Top of Page

Disclaimer | Advertising | Jobs | Privacy | About US | FC InsiderNews
© 2004-2006™ all rights reserved
Get newsFeed on your site.