Sunscreens may not be as good as claimed

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Editor's note: Be aware of the nanoparticles in sunscreens! Nanoparticles can disrupt DNA and cause mutation which can eventually lead to cancer development.

Dear Readers,

If you've ever used EWG to find a safer, more effective sunscreen, I need your help today.

We know that claims like "sunblock," "sweatproof" and "waterproof" on sunscreen labels are just marketing hype. So it was a small victory in 2011 when the federal Food and Drug Administration announced new regulations that will ban these terms on sunscreen labels. Since the 1990s, the FDA has considered these terms misleading.

Unfortunately, many sunscreen manufacturers continue to sell products labeled "sunblock," "sweatproof" and "waterproof" despite the FDA's stance. The fact is, sunscreens wash off in water and when you sweat. And they don't totally block the sun. But you can find these phony claims on products on the shelves of many major retailers - we checked just last week.

We can't afford to wait for the FDA to act. It recently announced that it will delay enforcement of the new regulations - years in the making - until after the 2012 summer season. So our best shot at getting manufacturers to fall in line is to tell stores to clear their shelves of sunscreens with these misleading labels. Will you add your voice right away?

Click here to join us in telling the nation's five largest retailers - including Walmart, Target, Walgreens and others - to take sunscreens with bogus claims off their shelves.

Just last week, EWG researchers found products carrying these over-hyped claims on their labels on store shelves.

American consumers need reliable information - not exaggerated or false claims - on sunscreen labels so they can make smart shopping decisions. The best way to influence manufacturers to bring their products in line with the new regulations now is to get major retailers to stop selling products with these false claims.

Click here to join us in telling the nation's five largest retailers - including Walmart, Target, Walgreens and others - to take sunscreens with bogus claims off their shelves.

Thank you for taking action. Together we can bring about real change in the market.

Sincerely,

Ken Cook
President, Environmental Working Group

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