Coffee, tea may reduce diabetes risk

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By David Liu davidl at foodconsumer dot org

Drinking coffee may help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The analysis of 457,000 subjects participating in about 3 dozens of studies found an inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Specifically, for each additional cup of coffee consumed each day, the diabetes risk was reduced in the drinkers compared to those who did not drink, the researchers found.

Those drank more than three to four cups had a one-fifth flower risk of diabetes than those drank no tea.

The coffee industry is happy with the study.

Dr.  Euan Paul, Director of the British Coffee Association was cited as commenting that "this large scientific evaluation adds to the overwhelming weight of evidence which demonstrates that moderate coffee consumption of four to five cups per day is safe and may even confer certain health benefits."

Food consumers should be aware that the findings are merely associations and do not prove that drinking coffee is the cause for the reduction in the risk of diabetes.

For instance, it is possible that those who drink coffee may also follow a lifestyle and or diet which may actually help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

An estimated 20 million Americans live with type 2 diabetes. And the cases are expected to double in next few years, according to recent news reports.

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