Eating eggs boosts risk of coronary heart disease in diabetics

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By Jimmy Downs

Friday Jan 18, 2013 (foodconsumer.org) -- A new study in British Medical Journal suggests that people with diabetes eating eggs can increase risk of coronary heart disease, compared with those who do not eat eggs.

Professor Liegang Liu from Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, People’s Republic of China and colleagues conducted the review study and found the association between egg consumption and elevated risk of coronary heart disease in diabetic people.

Liu et al. sorted out 17 reports including nine for coronary heart disease and eight for stroke released in PubMed and Embase prior to June 2012 and included in their meta-analysis data from 5847 incident cases of coronary heart disease identified from 3081269 person-years and 7579 cases of stroke identified from 4148095 person-years.

There was no clear associations found between egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease or stroke and the negative association was consistent among all studies, according to the meta-analysis.

However, an increase in egg consumption by one egg per day was associated with 9 percent increased risk of stroke and the association was consistent among all studies, but the significance level p value for the association was 0.10, which the authors considered was insignificant. (The risk could not be ruled out.  The result simply means that the association was not statistically significant).

A strong association was found between egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease among people who suffered diabetes.  Specifically, diabetics consuming the highest amount of eggs were 54 percent more likely to develop coronary heart disease, compared with those who consumed the lowest amount.

An estimated 25 million Americans live with diabetes, which doctors say has no cure, but can be controlled.  Diabetes can be easily prevented by following a healthy diet including low sugar, low fat, high bitter melon, high curcumin and cinnamon supplements.

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