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Drinking tea may cut prostate cancer risk

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By David Liu, PHD

Wednesday Feb 20, 2013 (foodconsumer.org) -- A new study in Cancer Causes and Control suggests that tea consumption may help reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

The study led by M.S. Geybels from Maastricht University in Maastricht, The Netherlands and colleagues analysed data from a population-based case-control study from King County, Washington USA and found men with high tea intake were up to 40 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

The study of 892 cases and 863 controls found drinking two cups or more of tea per day was associated with 37 percent reduced risk of prostate cancer, compared with those drinking 1 cup per day or less.

Coffee consumption was not associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

The researchers concluded "Our results contribute further evidence that tea consumption may be a modifiable exposure that reduces PCa (prostate cancer) risk."

Prostate cancer is diagnosed in 240,000 men each year in the United States, and the disease and its complications kill about 40,000 men annually in the country, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Prostate cancer in most cases is not aggressive, meaning that it does not pose life-threatening risk.  Men who are 70 or old may not bother to participate annual screening because prostate cancer screening can cause more harm than good and they are more likely to die from other health conditions.
 

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