This additive in your food and cosmetics may cause cancer!

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By David Liu

Saturday May 5, 2012 (foodconsumer.org) -- Zinc oxide, titanium oxide and silica dioxide (or simply silica) are nanoparticles that are commonly used in foods and supplements.  Those who do not want the nanoparticles to ruin their life should avoid food with any of these and other nanomaterials.

One study released in the Aug 2009 issue of Biomaterials reviewed the safety of nanoparticles and found that most engineered or man-made nanomaterial can cause harmful genotoxic response such as chromosomal fragmentation, DNA strand breakages, point mutations, oxidative DNA addducts and alterations in gene expression profiles. No major media outlets would like to report such research findings.

The authors of the review N. Singh of Swansea University in Wales UK and colleagues conducted their review because they recognized that it is essential to understand the safety of engineered nanomaterials and they knew that the nanotehcnology industry largely ignored the importance of the nanomaterials' genotoxic potential on human health.

Nanoparticles are widely used in food and cosmetic products.  They may be listed on the ingredient list or they may not be listed at all because the manufacturer considers it as a processing aid.  For instance, nanoparticles are used in flavors as anti-caking agents and they will not be listed in foods using such flavors.   Some studies found vitamin supplements may cause this or that disease such as prostate cancer, one health advocate speculated that one possible cause may be nanoparticles used in the dietary supplements.

Recently, a Russian study has found that nanoparticles, big (greater than 100 micrometer) or small (as small as 70 micrometer) can damage DNA and cause mutations potentially leading to carcinogenesis or the development of cancer.

Like the majority of chemicals currently used, most nanoparticles if not all have not adequately been assessed for their safety.  Numerous laboratory studies have shown that it is possible that nanoparticles can cause cancer!

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