Another egg recall issued, salmonella outbreak updated

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egg_fda_279957792.jpgAnother egg recall issued due to salmonella outbreak

Sparboe Farms based out of Litchfield, Minnesota  issued a voluntary egg recall on Aug 27 through the Egg Safety Media Hotline.  The recalled eggs were produced by Wright County Egg and Hillandale Farms, packaged by Sparboe Farms.

The egg recall, along with about a dozen other egg recalls, was issued by egg producers and distributors because of the association between their eggs and an ongoing salmonella outbreak, which has caused salmonella illness in more than one thousand people in the United States.

Eggs subject to this recall were distributed to grocery stores and food service establishments in Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Minnesota.

Large white eggs are sold under brand names including Albertson, Sparboe Farms, Liborio Market, Shamrock Foods and Glenview Farms.

The plant-number and Julian dates that are associated with the packages for the recalled eggs are as follows.

Configuration

Plant Number

Julian Dates

6 egg carton

1167

214, 215, 219

12 dozen carton

1167

214, 215, 219

18 dozen carton

1167

214, 215, 219

2 ½ dozen sleeve

1167

214, 215, 219

5 dozen sleeve

1167

214, 215, 219

15 dozen bulk cube

1167

214, 215, 219

30 dozen bulk case

1167

214, 215, 219

For extra Large eggs packaged under the Shurfresh brand name, the following configuration and codes apply:

Configuration

Plant Number

Julian Dates:

12 dozen carton

1906

211 and 218

 

Dates and codes are stamped on the end of the egg cartons or the top of the over wrap bag, according to the press release by the company. The plant number begins with the letter P followed by the plant number and then a Julian date.  For instance, P-1167 219 can show up on the package.
 
08.28_julian_date_544563322.jpgAll the eggs subject to various egg recalls associated with the salmonella outbreak have been listed here as of Aug 26.   The updated recall information covering the most recent recall can be found here.

Before the recall by Sparboe Farms, 11 egg recalls or expanded recalls were issued.  The first recall was issued on Aug 13 by Wright County Egg, which expanded its recall on April 18.  Other egg producers and distributors that issued an egg recall include NuCall Foods, COUNTRY Eggs Inc., Lubersk i Inc, Hilandale Farms, Moark, LLC, Trafficanda Egg Ranch, Cardenas Market and Cal-Maine Foods Inc.

More than 500 million eggs are affected by the recalls.

Salmonella train originates from Wright Count Egg and Hillandale Farms

Salmonella Enteritidis infection can cause fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea beginning 12 to 72 hours after a person ingests tainted eggs or other foods like tainted meat, poultry, milk and other foods. The illness usually disappears after 4 to 7 days of infection and most people do not need any treatment.

People who are at high risk for severe complications are elderly people, infants, and those with their immunity compromised such as cancer patients and organ recipients. In serious cases, the bacterium can spread to the intestines to the blood stream and then to other body parts causing death, unless the patient is treated promptly with antibiotics.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated on Friday the salmonella outbreak on its website  saying that as of Aug 25, about 1,470 people reported illnesses associated with this salmonella outbreak.  The real number can be much higher, as many people don't bother to report a minor illness.

The salmonella strain implicated in the outbreak has been identified in egg farm environmental samples, the CDC said.

The Food and Drug Administration has collected nearly 600 samples from Wright County Egg and Hillandale Farms of Iowa as part of its investigation. The FDA has not finished testing all samples.  Six samples collected from manure, traffic areas and the feed tested positive for salmonella whose PFGE patterns are indistinguishable from the outbreak strain. The CDC states that "Wright County Egg and Hillandale Farms of Iowa are the likely sources of the contaminated shell eggs."

Three lawsuits filed

Like many foodborne illness outbreaks, this salmonella outbreak has thus far led to the filing of at least three lawsuits against Wright County Egg, according to marlerblog.com, a site run by Seattle Washington based food safety attorney William Marler.

On behalf of Daniel and Libby Sands residents of Newton, Massachusetts, Marler's law office filed the third Salmonella Egg Complaint in the United States District Court Northern District of Iowa Western Division against Wright County Egg or Quality Egg, LLC.

The couple's daughter, A.S. on April 20 ate food at a North Carolina restaurant that used an egg product made of eggs produced by Wright County Egg; she then fell ill upon returning home to Massachusetts on April 22.

A.S. whose name is not disclosed, was hospitalized later on April 22 with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and remained hospitalized through April 29. During these days, she tested positive for Salmonella enteritidis.

How to prevent salmonella illness?

The CDC says people should not eat recalled and raw eggs.  Eggs need to fully cooked for human consumption. Individuals who are at risk of severe salmonella infection should particularly heed this advice.

Here is the detailed advice from the CDC.

Don’t eat recalled eggs. Recalled eggs might still be in grocery stores, restaurants, and consumers' homes. Consumers who have recalled eggs should discard them or return them to their retailer for a refund. A searchable database of products affected by the recall is available to consumers.
Individuals who think they might have become ill from eating recalled eggs should consult their health care providers.
Keep eggs refrigerated at ≤ 45° F (≤7° C) at all times.
Discard cracked or dirty eggs.
Wash hands, cooking utensils, and food preparation surfaces with soap and water after contact with raw eggs.
Eggs should be cooked until both the white and the yolk are firm and eaten promptly after cooking.
Do not keep eggs warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.
Refrigerate unused or leftover egg- containing foods promptly.
Avoid eating raw eggs.
Individuals wishing to further reduce their risk may consider using pasteurized, in-shell eggs.
Avoid restaurant dishes made with raw or undercooked, unpasteurized eggs. Restaurants should use pasteurized eggs in any recipe (such as Hollandaise sauce or Caesar salad dressing) that calls for raw eggs

Editing by Rachel Stockton

 

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